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How Does LED Filament Work?

We launched our filament bulb range a few months ago, so we thought we’d write a post to explain more about these bulbs, which makes them unique and how do LED filament work.

What are LED Filament Bulbs?

Filament LED bulbs usually look like traditional glass light bulbs. The yellow strip that provides the light, was created to look like the filament of an incandescent light bulb, hence the term LED filament bulb. The original LED filament bulb was intended to mimic the appearance of the original Edison light bulb, you can see in the image how the two compare.

Since then, however, the technology has proved highly popular and has been applied to many other types of LED bulbs.

Enjoy the warm color temperature of Feit Electric vintage light bulbs. Choose from traditional light bulb shapes in either incandescent or LED exposed filament, wrapped in a clear glass housing to deliver an elegant vintage look and feel.

Huaqiangbei, Shenzhen

How Do They Differ From Normal LED?

Regular LED bulbs use either a single large LED or several smaller chips arranged on a board or heat sink. As the LEDs are placed on a flat surface these bulbs typically produced only a 180-degree range of light.

The filament bulbs by comparison have the LEDs arranged in rows on small strips.

These strips face outward, producing a 360-degree angle of light, the same as the original incandescent bulbs.

When a filament bulb is lit, it looks like the whole yellow strip is lighting up. Yet it’s actually individual LED’s chips that are lighting up: In the image below you can see the individual LED chips that are placed along the strips.

Most dimmers installed today are designed to be used with high-power circuits to drive traditional filament lamps which were all quite uniform and dimmable by just a voltage change. LED lamps on the other hand are low-power and more complex. An LED bulb is a solid-state product that has built-in circuitry (called a driver) that takes high-voltage AC input current and converts it to low-voltage DC current to drive the LEDs. Furthermore, driver specifications are not uniform across the LED industry.

How Do LED Filament Bulbs Work?

The LED filament is composed of a metal strip with a series of LEDs aligned along with it. A transparent substrate, usually made from glass or sapphire materials is used to cover the LEDs. This transparency allows the emitted light to disperse evenly and uniformly without any interference or light loss.

The LED’s on the filament strip actually emit a blue colored light so an even coating of phosphor in a silicone resin binder material is placed over the glass to convert the blue light generated by the LEDs into a more preferable color. Different phosphor colors can be used to change the color of the light. For example, the more yellow the phosphor, the more yellow and warm the light becomes. This is how the different color temperatures are created.

The major benefit of this design is the ease with which near full global’ illumination can be obtained from arrays of filaments. Another positive benefit is better heat dissipation over traditional designs, due to the LED’s being more spread out, rather than densely concentrated. This in turn can lead to an increased lifespan.

The type of dimmer switch and it’s minimum/maximum load range will indicate the compatibility with LED light bulbs.

To find out how many LED light bulbs your dimmer switch can support, divide the minimum and maximum load of the dimmer by 10.

Main Features of LED Filament Range.

The clear glass cover and long LED filament make it possible for this bulb to provide a wide 360 coverage of warm light.

The LED filament bulbs are designed to the same dimensions as a traditional filament bulb, so replacing they couldn’t be easier!

They may look like retro style filament bulbs but they are packed with the latest LED technology and offer more than 100lm per Watt in energy efficiency.

Our standard filament range are all flicker-free and we also supply select lines in fully dimmable versions so you can turn the brightness down and turn the atmosphere up!

the new filament range comes in a wide range of shapes and fittings, so you can find the style that’s right for you. Bulbs are available in Candle, Bent Candle, Golfball, Standard GLS, and Large G95 Globe shapes.

120 Volts More details Add to Cart Maxlite Dimmable 4W 2700K T10 LED Filament Bulb, JA8 Compliant, Enclosed, and Outdoor Rated.

120 Volts More details Add to Cart Satco Dimmable 4.5W 2700K T10 LED Filament Bulb, Enclosed Fixture Rated.

The type of dimmer switch and it’s minimum/maximum load range will indicate the compatibility with LED light bulbs.

Flame Warm

Better than Conventional LED Bulbs The LED filament technology offers a 360-degree beam angle light pattern which the ordinary LED bulbs can’t. The bulb uses a clear glass bulb, unlike most LED lights, so it is just like an incandescent bulb. The true warm white light that is styled to look exactly like one of the very old incandescent bulbs makes you relax.

In Addition to our standard Day White and Warm White color temperatures, our filament range is available in a new temperature that we call flame Warm’.

Our Day White color temperature is around 4000K, whilst our Warm White is around 2800K. Flame Warm takes the color temperature even lower at 2200K and produces a very warm light that is similar to that of candlelight. This will give your rooms a really cozy and warm atmosphere that is great for relaxing in.

These are the main things that need to know about led filaments, we hope you found this post useful and informative.

But (there’s always a but), the advent of LED has also completely changed the dimmer game. Dimming your traditional incandescent light bulbs is still fairly straightforward, as I’ll explain below, but dimming LED light bulbs is somewhat trickier.

Dimming traditional incandescent light bulbs is relatively straightforward. Any leading edge dimmer carries with it a minimum and maximum load. As long as the light bulb or light bulbs paired with the dimmer sit within these tolerances, everything will work just fine.

Rated Wattage:

The main root of this problem is the massive disparity between incandescent and LED wattages. When a dimmer’s rated wattage is defined, it doesn’t take account of an LED light bulb’s drastically superior efficiency.

This is probably the most common mistake that people make when switching to LED, whereby they forget to divide the dimmer’s maximum wattage by 10 when considering its tolerances for LED. Remember to do this before assessing where your light bulb sits in terms of its wattage. If you’ve divided the dimmer’s rated wattage by 10 and your LED light bulb(s) cumulative wattage sits between its maximum and minimum values, crack on.

Most dimmers installed today are designed to be used with high-power circuits to drive traditional filament lamps which were all quite uniform and dimmable by just a voltage change. LED lamps on the other hand are low-power and more complex. An LED bulb is a solid-state product that has built-in circuitry (called a driver) that takes high-voltage AC input current and converts it to low-voltage DC current to drive the LEDs. Furthermore, driver specifications are not uniform across the LED industry.

Can I use my existing dimmer to dim my LED light bulbs?

This would entirely depend on the type of dimmer you have. If you’ve been using your dimmer with incandescent or halogen light bulbs in the past, I’d wager (not a betting man, remember) that it’s a leading-edge dimmer, though this may not always be the case. This assumption is based on the idea that leading-edge dimmers have been around much longer and are therefore more ubiquitous than the newer trailing edge variant. In this instance, it’s best to check what kind of dimmer switch you have.

Occasionally, a dimmer switch will only be able to dim an LED to a certain percentage, like 30% of full light instead of the promised 10%.

Sources:

 bulbs.com

 en.wikipedia.org

 cnet.com

 1000bulbs.com

 lightbulbs-direct.com